Geoscientist  What They Do

Just the Facts


Geoscientists Career Video



Studies the composition, structure, and other physical aspects of the Earth. May use geological, physics, and mathematics knowledge in exploration for oil, gas, minerals, or underground water; or in waste disposal, land reclamation, or other environmental problems. May study the Earth's internal composition, atmospheres, oceans, and its magnetic, electrical, and gravitational forces. Includes mineralogists, crystallographers, paleontologists, stratigraphers, geodesists, and seismologists.

This career is part of the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics cluster Science and Mathematics pathway.


A person in this career:

  • Analyzes and interprets geological, geochemical, or geophysical information from sources such as survey data, well logs, bore holes, or aerial photos.
  • Plans or conducts geological, geochemical, or geophysical field studies or surveys, sample collection, or drilling and testing programs used to collect data for research or application.
  • Prepares geological maps, cross-sectional diagrams, charts, or reports concerning mineral extraction, land use, or resource management, using results of fieldwork or laboratory research.
  • Analyzes and interprets geological data, using computer software.
  • Investigates the composition, structure, or history of the Earth's crust through the collection, examination, measurement, or classification of soils, minerals, rocks, or fossil remains.
  • Assesses ground or surface water movement to provide advice regarding issues such as waste management, route and site selection, or the restoration of contaminated sites.
  • Locates and estimates probable natural gas, oil, or mineral ore deposits or underground water resources, using aerial photographs, charts, or research or survey results.
  • Locates and reviews research articles or environmental, historical, or technical reports.
  • Communicates geological findings by writing research papers, participating in conferences, or teaching geological science at universities.
  • Measures characteristics of the Earth, such as gravity or magnetic fields, using equipment such as seismographs, gravimeters, torsion balances, or magnetometers.

Insider Info

Dig into the details and check out what people in this job have to say about their work.



Working Conditions and Physical Demands

People who do this job report that:

  • You would often handle loads up to 10 lbs., sometimes up to 20 lbs. You might do a lot of walking or standing, or you might sit but use your arms and legs to control machines, equipment or tools.
  • Work in this occupation requires being inside most of the time
  • Work in this occupation requires being outside most of the time
  • Work in this occupation involves sitting more than one-third of the time

Working in this career involves (physical activities):

  • Seeing clearly at a distance
  • Seeing clearly up close
  • Speaking clearly enough to be able to be understood by others
  • Identifying and understanding the speech of another person

Work Hours and Travel

  • Overnight travel

Specialty and Similar Careers

Careers that are more detailed or close to this career:

  • Engineering Geologist --
  • Environmental Protection Geologist --
  • Exploration Geologist --
  • Geological Specialist --
  • Geologist -- Studies the solid and liquid matter that constitutes the Earth as well as the processes and history that has shaped it.
  • Geophysicist -- Studies physical aspects of the earth, including the atmosphere. Investigates and measures seismic, gravitational, electrical, thermal, and magnetic forces affecting the earth.
  • Mine Geologist --
  • Petroleum Geologist --
  • Project Geologist --